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i bought a real-live oil painting at a garage sale for a whopping $1 this weekend.

so... it's a brightly colored and highly textured, impressionistic scene of an italian town on the edge of what is probably the Mediterranean  or Aegean sea. probably just a somewhat cheap painting to sell to tourists, but it's not badly done.

the only problem is the overly bright, Disneylandesque colors... so, i'm thinking that some kind of glaze would tone it down, make it look a little more 'old' or sophisticated.

any ideas on what would work?
  • Listening to: Goodbye and Hello - Tim Buckley
  • Reading: Edible Landscaping book
  • Watching: computer screen - duh.
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:iconmilbisous:
milbisous Featured By Owner Sep 22, 2009
Why don't you post the photo of the painting so we get an idea what you're talking about?
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:iconzasu:
zasu Featured By Owner Sep 22, 2009
i'm thinking of doing that - i'll have to take a photo of it :D
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:icondennisv:
dennisv Featured By Owner Sep 22, 2009
Painters use linseed oil, this medium for oil painting tend to make the painting yellowish as time goes by. Or if you dare to. Buy some burn umber oil paint, thinned it with linseed oil like a water color and then apply it as transparent coating. Try it in a white, yellow surface first.
Let it dry and see how it goes. If you find that it darkens the bright yellow or white [sample surface]. Then proceed with the plan.
Burnt umber color is the prelim sketch paint they use.

Speaking of oil painting. I think it is time for me to start oil painting. My curiousity [killed the cat?] is growing everyday. I purchased some oil paints, brushes and masonite board that I will primed with white paint. For some reason I do not like canvas? I am wanted to try the Glazing technique. Reading and researching about it. I am nervous and yet I am excited to start my first traditional painting in the 21st century where almost all peeps are into digital medium. Anyways it's a gift to myself I am turning half a century this coming October 26! Yey! :giggle:
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:iconzasu:
zasu Featured By Owner Sep 22, 2009
my husband probably has some linseed oil sitting around - he used it to "finish" our unstained wood ceiling and walls in our cabin up in the mountains. we wanted to use something natural :D and we can find some burnt umber oil paint too.

my husband was actually trained in germany as a decorative painter - he used to restore churches throughout europe, and restored frescoes too - so he's familiar with this stuff. but not really with oil paintings. i just wanted to see if there was anything i should do or not do with an oil painting :)

i think you should try some oil painting too. half a century, eh? i am only 3 years away from that too :shocked:
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:icondennisv:
dennisv Featured By Owner Sep 22, 2009
I see, as I said, make an example first so that you would see how it looks. Try painting a wood panel with similar or close the brightness of the painting you purchased. Then apply the burnt umber oil color thinned with linseed oil like a watercolor almost. When it dries you'll see the result...and then you decide if it alright, needs more second coating perhaps? or it just enough? It's good your hubby know some stuff about painting even not the oil painting. For me personally, I have to test and trial first. And when I have tried and it works. I will proceed with the original painting.

Yeah, I am going to be a big five-0! ;)
I just finished priming the wood [masonite board] panel with water based paint [acrylic].
I think it needs a second coating and perhaps it will do and a little bit of soft sanding.
It would take a while to from start to finish. I am glad I will do this. It is a different
experience and journey personally.
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:iconzasu:
zasu Featured By Owner Sep 22, 2009
good advice on testing the toner first, and, enjoy your journey :nod:
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:iconfangfingers:
Fangfingers Featured By Owner Sep 22, 2009  Professional General Artist
Well shellac would turn oldish and give it a yellowish / brownish cast ( degree dependent on how old the shellac is ) Shellac shouldn't end up as glossy as varnish would.

Or let a heavy smoker borrow it for a while and then dont clean it..

Or you could get a brush on matte coating and then add small amounts of the right acrylic color(s) to dirty up the matte medium...like a wash sorta. ( you could also wipe that right off as you apply it for a more patina type effect )

Of course if you do a lot to it remember to add a "+zasu " near the signature.

Whatever you try ...test on the edge where the frame lip would hide it anyway and judge from that :)



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:iconzasu:
zasu Featured By Owner Sep 22, 2009
are you suggesting... that i mix the matte coating plus one acrylic color, apply it to some spots, then mix matte coating with another color, and apply it to different spots, and so on... maybe based on the original paint color of the area? i mean... sort of like over painting? or just one color plus the matte coating, and wash it over the entire painting?

also... does acrylic go over oil successfully? i'm guessing it's oil because every brush stroke is so textured.
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:iconfangfingers:
Fangfingers Featured By Owner Sep 22, 2009  Professional General Artist
are you suggesting... that i mix the matte coating plus one acrylic color, apply it to some spots, then mix matte coating with another color, and apply it to different spots, and so on... maybe based on the original paint color of the area? i mean... sort of like over painting? or just one color plus the matte coating, and wash it over the entire painting?
===============================================

The matte brush on coating acts as a binder for ( whatever/how many)colors you want to add do it at the time... The only reason you would want to do successive coats is to darken or dull it further... Sometimes projects like these it is best to do several light coats as opposed to one big one..but it is all about your own desired end results ...there is no "formula" ( when i suggested wiping it off right after you apply it ..that would merely be a technique which might achieve the same effect several light coats which were not rubbed off would ...think applying stain to wood ...but the depth or richness of the stain is up to you because you are making it yourself when you apply small amounts of color to the matte coating before you brush it on )

Go here and click on the PLASTIC VARNISH FLAT picture in the top row ----> [link] ...then read the stuff under it... you should get a better idea of what i'm trying to relate ...

This is what i would try/test with if i were doing it...
You should be able to find a similar product locally tho some poorer made matte finishes yellow with age...this product comes in quarts too....i am not affiliated with them ...i have used there stuff a lot in murals and theater work and it is the best i currently know of.



also... does acrylic go over oil successfully? i'm guessing it's oil because every brush stroke is so textured.
=============================================================================================
If the oil is dry ...then it is non porous ...so a coating will work over it ...well even if it is acrylic it is still non porous ... Nowadays you can put anything over anything if you are determined enuff... In either case you can expect nothing you do to the surface to soak into the painting... so a matte coat becomes like a sheet of dulling plastic over the surface...it becomes ( in essence ) a sheet of "tinted" plastic ( more or less ) over the surface when you add coloring to the finish....get it?..:)

The important thing is like i said ...test your process on a 1/4 in of the edge that is more colorful and keep trying different applications and procedures on different edges until you see the desired results ..then tackle the whole thing
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:iconzasu:
zasu Featured By Owner Sep 22, 2009
cool... looked at your link. will think about all this now :D

:thanks:
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:iconkayaksailor:
kayaksailor Featured By Owner Sep 22, 2009
How cool! I love yardsales :iconlovenodplz: (I got my Nikon at one :w00t:) Sorry that I have no ideas for you...but a great plan!
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:iconzasu:
zasu Featured By Owner Sep 22, 2009
yeah, i've seen so many analog cameras and lens sets at garage sales... i almost bought a great canon AE1 (to replace my old canon AE1 that i'd used for 25 years) with a bunch of amazing lenses last year for $75. but realized i just didn't want to mess with film anymore :/
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:iconkayaksailor:
kayaksailor Featured By Owner Sep 22, 2009
I know what you mean, I've seen lots of film cameras, too, but I was lucky...I got my Digital Nikon (D100) at one :w00t: The woman selling it is a professional portrait and wedding photographer and she'd decided that she just didn't like digital...go figure...but great for me!!

It is probably about 8-9 years old now (I've had it about 3 1/2 years) and there are lots of new or at least improved technology, but it works well and has most of anything I need...and I don't have a couple grand to spend on another right now :laughing:
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